3.1 Watch the following video

3.2 Tick those objects that you have watched in the video:

elephant
 

tablet
 

cigarettes
 

bottle of wine
 

fire
 

cards
 

pelican
 

chocolate coins
 

apple
 

candle
 

Christmas tree
 

cow
 

carrot
 

castle
 

telephone
 

3.3 Read the following text about Hanukkah:



 

It's time to celebrate Hanukkah, the Jewish Festival of Lights that lasts for eight days and nights. The holiday's popularity grows in modern times, but its origins date back to the centuries following the death of Alexander the Great, the ancient Macedonian leader who conquered the Persian Empire.

 

Today Hanukkah is celebrated on the 25th day of Kislev (the ninth month of the Hebrew calendar), which typically falls in late November to mid-December. For eight nights, candles are lit in a menorah, a candelabrum with spaces for nine candles—one for each night plus a “servant” candle called the shamash. On each successive night, one more candle is added and lit. During the lighting, people recite special blessings and prayers. Songs are sung, and gifts are exchanged.

 

This year, the COVID-19 pandemic is expected to interrupt Hanukkah celebrations across the world as health officials advise families and communities not to meet. But not even a pandemic can stop this festival dedicated to the miracle of light. Instead, much of the festivities will take place from a distance, from virtual menorah lightings to drive-thru remembering of the Hanukkah story.

Adapted from: https://www.nationalgeographic.com/history/article/history-of-hanukkah

3.4 Add paragraph headings to the text:

●        How is Hanukkah celebrated? 

●        How has Covid-19 pandemic affected the celebration of Hanukkah? 

●        What is Hanukkah?
3.5 Decide whether the following statements are true or false

1.       Hanukkah is also called “the Festival of Candles”  

2.       Hanukkah starts on 25 of December every year.  

3.       Hanukkah lasts for 8 days and 8 nights.  

4.       During the lightning of candles people are singing the national anthem.  

5.       Because of the Covid-19 restrictions, parts of Hanukkah are celebrated virtually.

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